Pakistan and Afghanistan to Issue Temporary Admission Document for Transit Trade

Pakistan and Afghanistan to Issue Temporary Admission Document for Transit Trade in 2022

As part of the Afghan Transit Trade, Pakistan and Afghanistan will remain each issue a Temporary Admission Document (TAD) that will allow vehicles from either country to enter their borders for international transportation of goods under the terms of the deal.

The Federal Board of Revenue (FBR) wants to make more changes to the Customs Rules 2001 through SRO 550. People who work at embassies and consulates from both countries will be able to issue the TAD for a fee of $100, according to the new rules. People who get the TAD will be able to come and go as many times as they want for 180 days (six months). They can stay for up to 30 days in Pakistan and Afghanistan.

Pakistan Customs and Afghanistan’s Ministry of Transportation will share a list of approved transport operators and vehicles, and they will do this in person. When new transportation operators or cars are added to the list, the other side will get an email right away, and both sides will pick people to be in charge of quickly sharing this information.

TAD holders can carry both transit goods and bilateral goods. Any truck found transporting goods between two destinations inside the territory of the contracting party will be banned from the TAD. The TAD will only work on certain routes and crossing points.

As part of the Afghan transit trade, goods can be moved from one container to another. This is called cross-stuffing, and it can happen both inside and outside of the seaport terminals where the goods arrive.

The Customs Computerized System (CCS) will let you cross-stuff when you file your GD.

To cross-stuff at the seaport terminal, the trader or their representative must also give the old container number, new or empty containers, the name of a bonded carrier, and their vehicle registration number. The Customs Computerized System (CCS) will make three messages for the same GD at the same time with all the information the trader has given.

Once goods are cross-stuffed, an inspector will write up his report in the CCS, along with photos of the cargo. He will also attach a seal to a new container that has been cross-stuffed with items. Following the submission of the report, the system will ask the examiner about any discrepancies it found.

The Pakistan Customs Container Security System (PCCSS) staff will look at the Transportation Note and the Weight Slip, and they will check the seal of the container. The team will make a report called a “container entry report” (CER) for the incoming container, and any discrepancies in the seal, weight, transport note, or any other thing will be recorded in it.

Trader or their representative must also give information about the old container number, new container number, new or empty container number, and vehicle registration number if the 11 cross-stuffing options are chosen when they file a GD. The CCS will make three messages for the same GD simultaneously, along with all the information the trader gave it.

The bonded carrier will pay for all of the costs of restuffing or repacking the goods, as well as the taxes and duties that must be paid on goods that were stolen or damaged on the way to or from the ODT under these rules.

The bank guarantee or defense savings certificates that transport operators submitted when they were granted a license will be used to get back the amount of taxes, fines, and penalties that the cargo owes while it is being moved from the port of entry to the ODT. This includes damage, theft, fire, accidents, and more.

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